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Nov 18, 2016

a homemade home... episode 1










Welcome! 

Welcome to my cottage.  A humble place where I enjoy making things with my hands.  My Lord has been so good to me!  He placed me in this wonderful little town, filled with shepherds, farmers and very talented ladies that love to share their craft. 

I have been spinning yarn over 4 years now.... and each year I learn something new. 

Receiving raw fleece right after the sheep has been sheared, it'exciting, smelly and a bit daunting.  At least it was for me... at first.  

I have about 10 bags filled with raw fleece donated to me by a wonderful family that raise their own  for food and fiber.  I met this dear lady in one of those heritage days that are part of  late summer days here in the mountains. 

I brought the bags home and left them in the garage until I let go of the fear of washing wool.  I visited You Tube to see others do it, and I still felt a bit apprehensive in trying it out myself. 

But today, after returning from a doctor's appointment, and seeing that the temperatures were steady in the 60's...I pulled one bag and began the process.  

Washing wool just takes a bit of time.  Fill a basin with very hot water.  Add a bit of regular detergent.  Let it sit for about 15 minutes.  Rinse with hot water.  Repeat the process if the fleece is still quite filthy.  Otherwise, you rinse and spin dry with a salad spinner.  Lay them on top of screens to dry overnight and that is all! 

It took me 1 hour from start to finish.  Now, I did not finish the entire bag, since each bag is one full sheep's fleece.  So I just pull a bit and do two batches at a time.  

At this rate, I think I'll be finish before the winter truly sets in :-) 

Once the yarn is dried, combed and made into roving, it is time to spin the wool to make yarn. 

And that is a post for another day... 

Have a blessed weekend dear friends, and do something crafty! 

mari


14 comments:

  1. How lovely the fleece looks after washing. I can imagine it is a relief to get to the non-smelly stage and see the white coming through.

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    1. It is :D some smell stays on the fleece a bit, but it is when I wash it after spinning it that it leaves completely :D mari

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  2. Oh my goodness, Mari! I wish I knew how to spin wool but I'm pretty sure I would never be able to get the fleece to the spinning stage! I would be so overwhelmed! I loved this post!

    Grace & Peace,
    Pam

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    1. Hello Pam :0) actually it is not as hard as you may think. If you know how to use a treadle sewing machine, you can use a spinning wheel :D thank you so much for visiting... mari

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  3. I like carding the wool. Will you dye it or leave it natural? It looks very nice. What kind of sheep did it come from?

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    1. Actually Anne, I am not sure :0) I think I want to spin it and then decide. I do want to use natural dyes since the chemical ones are just not good for me... the sheep is a domestic breed called Clun-Forest sheep. And it is been raised locally here in Rome, PA :0) mari

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  4. Sounds like you had a nice productive day, Mari. I'd like to try spinning one day...it must be so rewarding! Bless you... Trish

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    1. It is Trish...calming and quite fun :0)

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  5. I have been learning how to spin for awhile so it was a pleasure to come across your blog.

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    1. Thank you so much for visiting...mari

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  6. Oh Mari! I simply love your blog. Spinning yarn has been a dream of mine for years. When Poppy and I moved into the cabin in 1989, he came home from work one day with black sheep, then white sheep. I loved them and they were pets but I had no idea how to shear them or use the wool. Had no luck finding someone to teach me. You have inspired me to try again. We have the internet now! I love your sewing room with the spinning wheel...how cozy and adorable. I also love the pictures of the ladies. I could absolutely dress like that and some days I do wear my pantaloons and long skirts. Sorry for going on and on! Love, Henny

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    1. Oh Henny...how fun! You should try it and learning is not as hard as you may think :0) I do wear long skirts and pantaloons in the winter. I feel very comfortable in them :) mari

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  7. Hello
    Mari, how exciting to make something woollen from scratch! It will be so special.
    I think Clun Forest might be in Wales...so the original breed was Welsh. Wales is good at sheep!!
    I'm happy to be following you again ~ my blog is not up and running at the moment, but I hope to change that soon.
    Blessings! xx

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    1. Oh how wonderful to have you visit Alex :0) Clun Forest fleece spins like butter :D mari

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